Recent Work (Since 2012)

August Moon, Image Capture on Broken Cell Phone after George Zimmerman Release Riots, 2013, archival digital print, 76.2 x 101.6 cm

This series features a collection of aestheticized images found on the Internet of the most vile human rights crimes, from the killing of Trayvon Martin to incidents in Syria, and reveals the global seduction of representations of violence.

Home Front, Cycles of Contention, 2011, custom-made dollhouse, 2 channel synchronized video installation, 62 x 63.5 x 47 cm

In Home Front, footage of a married couple is incorporated into a Gothic style dollhouse. Visible only through the window, a 33-minute unedited sequence shows the dissolution of an idyllic domestic scene into a disturbing and violent fight. Another window of the dollhouse features a 26-minute loop of footage of the couple recounting the events, each giving subjective, conflicting interpretations of their dispute.

Past Tense, 2014, network based multimedia artwork (Mac mini, cell phone, projector, sensor, webcam, speakers), 20 x 48 x 48 cm

Past Tense features the projection of a series of photographs culled from the online image-sharing platform Flickr of different forms of destruction, obsolescence, demolition, and extinction. Based on searching the database for photographs tagged with the term “endangered,” the feed was regularly updated during the work’s exhibition. An iPhone installed on a nearby pedestal surreptitiously photographs viewers and then integrates the snapshots into the image stream alongside the projected images sourced from Flickr, instigating the idea that the viewer’s time is also fragile and endangered.

Tania Bruguera: A State of Vulnerability

Documenting the personal and emotional fallout of Bruguera’s unjust detentions, Hershman Leeson’s new film observes the Bruguera’s sessions with psychiatrist Dr. Frank Ochberg, one of the founding fathers of modern psycho-traumatology who helped first define Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. An intimate and profound discussion of family disorders and cultural trauma emerges as the film touches on the various ways in which censorship of both the family and society have come to shape Bruguera’s aesthetic.